Adam Crouse: A Musician’s Tale

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Adam Crouse: A Musician’s Tale

Photo by: Kristen Loney

Photo by: Kristen Loney

Photo by: Kristen Loney

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Bob Marley once said, “One good thing about music: when it hits you, you feel no pain.” Guitarist Adam Crouse says he agrees with the quote wholeheartedly. Despite a life-threatening birth defect called Craniosynostosis, Crouse overcame his disability and learned to do things that any normal kid could do.

“Music. Everything music. Songwriting, guitar, jazz band… the list goes on,” Crouse said when asked about his hobbies. “When I’m not doing jazz band, I’m playing my Gibson Maestro.”

Crouse says he loves guitar because it’s a beautiful instrument, that the sound is amazing. His love for music led to the creation of garage band “Echo Nights.”

“We haven’t really gotten together yet, but I’ve been writing a lot of songs,” Crouse said of the band. “I am working, though, to get everyone together.”

Crouse said his biggest inspiration is life. “I think that every musician writes about life. There’s so much good and bad in the world. Everybody has a story, and those stories make great songs.”

Crouse said his guitar teacher’s name was Jon, that he is very thankful to him, and they became good friends. “Unfortunately, Jon moved to a new job. I haven’t seen him since October of 2012. I miss him; he was a really great friend.”

Unfortunately, one of Crouse’s biggest inspirations, a 14-year-old girl named Hannah, committed suicide in January of 2013.

Crouse said that she’d become like a friend because of her story. “It was tragic, and I couldn’t help but feel sorry for her. She inspired my song ‘End of the World.’ I felt horrible because I wasn’t able to stop her from doing it. I tried my hardest, but sometimes your hardest isn’t good enough.” Crouse said he turned to music to ease the grief of her passing.

“Music means the world to me,” Crouse said. “Without it, I wouldn’t be able to cope. It really helps soothe the soul. It’s an outlet for anybody out there, almost like a life preserver to people who are drowning. Music is my life. A lot of people say that, but in my case it’s true.”

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