Protesting the Dress Code Protests

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Protesting the Dress Code Protests

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It seems that the trend is growing to protest the school dress code. The student body commonly stands against the faculty’s rules on attire, and around the country more and more young teens are voicing their opinion through social media and posters. Many students wonder if any change will ever come from their actions, but are their arguments credibly sound?

Claims for school dress codes for shorts include:

-The dress code is sexist due to it specifically targeting girls for their dress

-The dress code sexualizes minors

-Codes blame girls for distracting boys

The first claim seems to walk on shaky ground when placed in a real-life scenario. In common fashion sense, most men choose not to wear shorts that rise more than 3 inches above the knee. So is the dress code really targeting girls alone? When it tends to be young women whose shorts break dress code? The only way we could test this theory out would be to see if a man could wear dress code violation shorts for an entire day, if he can then the school is now in the realm of sexism.

The second blurb is confusing in the fact that the purpose of the dress code alone is to prevent the sexualization of minors. To say that the very people trying to stop a sexual atmosphere in school are the ones being sexist is very confusing.

The final statement can be discredited by many staff members answering it with, “The outfits that break dress code could be considered inappropriate in an environment specifically designed for learning.”

Simply put: the code doesn’t mean that it is only meant to prevent boys from admiring the female form. Its intentions are to make sure that learning is the main goal of the day.

Now, moving on from shorts alone, we can examine the act of displaying shoulders in school. It is a common argument that your shoulders hold no sexual value, so what is the point of covering them? The faculty would likely respond with the fact that most shirts that show shoulders are revealing in the chest region.

Can a common ground be found for both staff and students?  For tank tops, we as a school could form an honor system of sorts. If we earn the right to show our shoulders the light of day, could we maintain ourselves as a whole and ensure our modesty?

I as a Basehor-Linwood Bobcat hope so.

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